early spring

You don’t have to wait til May…

To have beautiful spring flowers.

There is that small window of time from winter to full on spring where we are stuck with not much blooming around us.  An easy remedy is to fill your planters and a few planting beds with forced blooming plants.  From pansies, tulips to hyacinths it’s easy to get that burst of much need color!

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Did you see that?

Yeah that stuff under the snow…grass!  Maybe spring really is just around the corner!  Are you itching to get your hands dirty?  Well since we still have a few more cold days on the horizon, tilling the garden might be out for now but a good task to accomplish in the mean time is pruning. Most plants benefit from some sort of regular pruning and maintenance. The trick is to know when to prune. Most flowering and fruiting plants prefer to be pruned while they are dormant, in late winter through early spring. Spring blooming trees and shrubs, will start setting new buds soon after they are done flowering. A good rule of thumb is to prune summer and fall flowering trees and shrubs in the dormant season (late winter / early spring) and to prune spring flowering trees and shrubs soon after their flowers fade.

hydrangea-annabelle-winter-3

Pruning in early spring best solves certain problems, even on spring blooming plants. It is always good to remove dead and dying branches prior to new growth coming out in spring. This directs energy to healthier buds. Removal of a few crowded stems each year will open up the interior of the plant, providing better air circulation and light penetration.  Just use caution on spring flowering plants; only remove what is necessary to correct the problem.  You don’t want to remove those flower buds that will be blooming in the next few months or else you’ll have to wait another 12 to see those flowers.

Still a bit too cold?  Our crews can get the job done for you, contact our office for a quote on dormant pruning.

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Bring on spring!

Extending the look and the season by adding containers throughout the landscape is a terrific way to accessorize–in a small space or as focal points within a sweeping environment.  Containers allow you to incorporate plants into the patio or near the home, add height and artistic appeal, and update the garden from season to season.

We can start by punctuating the landscape with bursts of color as early as Late March into April.  We use forced bulbs, branches, pansies, and other cold hardy annuals to welcome spring. Contact us now, Van Zelst Inc, to bring instant color to your yard!

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Dormant pruning…

The snow has finally melted, maybe spring really is just around the corner!  Are you itching to get your hands dirty?  Well since we still have a few more cold days on the horizon, tilling the garden might be out for now but a good task to accomplish in the mean time is pruning. Most plants benefit from some sort of regular pruning and maintenance. The trick is to know when to prune. Most flowering and fruiting plants prefer to be pruned while they are dormant, in late winter through early spring. Spring blooming trees and shrubs, will start setting new buds as soon as the old buds have fallen. These will need to be pruned shortly after flowering.  A good rule of thumb is to prune summer and fall flowering trees and shrubs in the dormant season (late winter / early spring) and to prune spring flowering trees and shrubs soon after their flowers fade.

Pruning in early spring best solves certain problems, even on spring blooming plants. It is always good to remove dead and dying branches prior to new growth coming out in spring. This directs energy to healthier buds. Removal of a few crowded stems each year will open up the interior of the plant, providing better air circulation and light penetration.  Just use caution on spring flowering plants; only remove what is necessary to correct the problem.  You don’t want to remove those flower buds that will be blooming in the next few months or else you’ll have to wait another 12 to see those flowers!

Don’t have time to do this yourself?  Contact us and we’ll get our professional crews out to take care of your dormant prunes.

snow 4.15 (1)

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Stretch…

Extending your annuals season to season. We all get excited for summer and filling our planters with beautiful annuals. But why sell yourself short when you can have plants in all the seasons.

Start your spring off with a planter filled with tulips, daffodils and pansies. These are great early plants that will bring a bright spot to your entryway.

Here are a few more ideas to fill your planter!

  • Curly willow for height.
  • Beautiful hydrangea for a focal point.
  • Snapdragons, ranunculus and stock for a punch of color.
  • Ivy for added green.

Get more ideas here!

And when summers flowers fade don’t forget fall and winter annuals!

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The fruits of our labor…

Dreaming of some color in the landscape so lets talk bulbs! If you are like me, last fall you planted a variety of bulbs that should perk up the landscape as soon as the snow starts to melt.

Some of the earliest to show up are winter aconite and snowdrops (appropriately named!). They are tiny little reminders that spring is coming! Then the real fun begins…hyacinths, daffodils, tulips oh my (just to name a few)! Those small bulbs of fall can bring so much color in a short time to the garden. Painting the landscape with drifts of tulips or a carpet of grape hyacinths.

So once the snow melts be on the look out for:

 

 

 

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