pruning

Spring to do list…

Now that the days are getting longer, that only means one thing…spring is around the corner!  So let’s take a minute and plan out our spring to do list.

First things first you’ll want to do a thorough clean up of the planting beds and lawn.  This means removing leaf debris, cutting back perennials and removing dead plants.  After the beds are clean this is also a great time to edge the planting beds from the lawn.

Now you can focus on the living plant material.  You’ll want to prune shrubs and ornamentals of any crossing, broken, dead or diseased branches.  Just this small step leads to a healthier more robust plant.  It’s also a great time to divide some perennials.  You’ll know it’s time to divide when a clump has overgrown its space, has diminished flowering, or the clump starts to die out in the middle.  Spring flowering perennials are best divided after they flower, but most other later flowering perennials will be just fine divided in the spring.

As you are surveying your landscape be sure to pull any weeds you see, it’s amazing how fast they pop up so best to keep on top of them.  A final finishing touch to the garden is to add a layer of mulch to the beds.  This will help prevent new weeds from growing and protect your newly divided perennials as they begin to grow.

Next up is the lawn.  Spring is a great time to fix it up.  As it begins to dry up it’s a great time to dethatch the grass, this is the method of using a rake or a dethatching machine to gently remove the layer of dead grass (thatch) that has built up in the lawn.  You’ll want to do this before the lawn really takes off.   Be sure to patch up any areas of bare/dead spots with some grass seed.  The final step is to fertilize your lawn and while you’re at it you can hit those planting beds as well.

The last and final touch to the landscape is to add some fun colorful early annuals (to learn more about early annuals check out this blog).  Just a sprinkling of pansies or some forced bulbs in planters can really brighten the landscape!

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Did you see that?

Yeah that stuff under the snow…grass!  Maybe spring really is just around the corner!  Are you itching to get your hands dirty?  Well since we still have a few more cold days on the horizon, tilling the garden might be out for now but a good task to accomplish in the mean time is pruning. Most plants benefit from some sort of regular pruning and maintenance. The trick is to know when to prune. Most flowering and fruiting plants prefer to be pruned while they are dormant, in late winter through early spring. Spring blooming trees and shrubs, will start setting new buds soon after they are done flowering. A good rule of thumb is to prune summer and fall flowering trees and shrubs in the dormant season (late winter / early spring) and to prune spring flowering trees and shrubs soon after their flowers fade.

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Pruning in early spring best solves certain problems, even on spring blooming plants. It is always good to remove dead and dying branches prior to new growth coming out in spring. This directs energy to healthier buds. Removal of a few crowded stems each year will open up the interior of the plant, providing better air circulation and light penetration.  Just use caution on spring flowering plants; only remove what is necessary to correct the problem.  You don’t want to remove those flower buds that will be blooming in the next few months or else you’ll have to wait another 12 to see those flowers.

Still a bit too cold?  Our crews can get the job done for you, contact our office for a quote on dormant pruning.

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Dormant pruning…

The snow has finally melted, maybe spring really is just around the corner!  Are you itching to get your hands dirty?  Well since we still have a few more cold days on the horizon, tilling the garden might be out for now but a good task to accomplish in the mean time is pruning. Most plants benefit from some sort of regular pruning and maintenance. The trick is to know when to prune. Most flowering and fruiting plants prefer to be pruned while they are dormant, in late winter through early spring. Spring blooming trees and shrubs, will start setting new buds as soon as the old buds have fallen. These will need to be pruned shortly after flowering.  A good rule of thumb is to prune summer and fall flowering trees and shrubs in the dormant season (late winter / early spring) and to prune spring flowering trees and shrubs soon after their flowers fade.

Pruning in early spring best solves certain problems, even on spring blooming plants. It is always good to remove dead and dying branches prior to new growth coming out in spring. This directs energy to healthier buds. Removal of a few crowded stems each year will open up the interior of the plant, providing better air circulation and light penetration.  Just use caution on spring flowering plants; only remove what is necessary to correct the problem.  You don’t want to remove those flower buds that will be blooming in the next few months or else you’ll have to wait another 12 to see those flowers!

Don’t have time to do this yourself?  Contact us and we’ll get our professional crews out to take care of your dormant prunes.

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It’s time for a haircut! Well for your plants at least.

Summer pruning and deadheading is a repetitive job but it is something we need to do to ensure that plants continue to flower all season long and will add healthy new growth next year. It allows the plant to slow its growth down by reducing the surface area of the leaves therefore slowing down the amount of food produced and sent to the roots. Pruning in summer is also a great time for corrective purpose.

Basic Pruning practices:

  1. Remove any dead or diseased wood. Although it is more difficult to see the outline of a tree in leaf, it should be easier once you have removed any unhealthy stems.
  2. Take out stems that are growing toward the center of the tree. Be wary of pruning large branches that will heal slowly.
  3. Remove any crossing branches to prevent them from rubbing against each other and causing wounds that may result in serious damage
  4. Prune out weak stems that did not produce flowers or that have few leaves, and rub out shoots forming on the lower trunk.
  5. Keep the tree in shape by reducing the length of wayward side stems and excessive new growth by cutting them back by about one-third.

Hedges grow rapidly in summer. The heavy shearing of hedges that exposes too much of the interior wood and the tender interior leaves, will cause scorching from the hot summer sun. Sunburn then kills the wood and leaves, resulting in a half-dead, scraggly hedge. It is best to shear hedges lightly and frequently in summer.

Perhaps the most labor-intensive plants to prune in the garden are the perennials. Perennials are not maintenance-free as most new gardeners might think. Most perennial plants, especially the flowering ones, not only need to be cut back entirely at some point before or after the growing season, they need regular pruning, shearing or deadheading.

Pruning generally creates a healthier, more robust and attractive plant.

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