Author Archives: VZ staff

If it feels like fall, it must be!

My favorite time of year.  Although our first official fall day won’t be until September 23rd!  With a string of cooler days and nights the plants are telling us fall is coming!  Some of the leaves are just starting to change and the summer annuals are looking pretty sad.  So now is the time to switch it up and add some color to those planters.  You could get another two months from them!

So fall makes you think of mums, kale and pansies.  These might be the staples of the fall annual garden but there are lots of other materials you can use to brighten up those fall planters.

Check out these fun planters filled with color and fun textures!

This one is filled with pretty purple mums, bold annual rudbeckias, millet, weeping ornamental pepper plants and pansies. It certainly brightens up a drab corner.

 


This planter is accented with a fun contrast of purple and white. We used annual fountain grass, black pearl peppers, himalayan honeysuckle, ornamental kale, mums, pansies, weeping ornamental pepper and then accented it with a cute white pumpkin.

 

Try mixing it up by adding some of these accents to your fall planter!

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Do you have a green thumb? How about green pavers?

Going green in the landscape is not only about plants but your hard surfaces as well. An alternative to help the environment is by using permeable pavers (Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement).

Permeable Pavers

These concrete pavers are created so that the joint openings are typically 5-15% of the surface area and are filled with highly permeable aggregates.  This type of installation requires a much deeper base of angular rock.  This, in turn, allows storm water to runoff more effectively. It even filtrates the water as it passes through the surface joints, base and into the ground below.

To learn more about how you can “Go Green” contact Van Zelst Inc. for a proposal.

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The dog days of summer…

August is typically the hottest and driest month of summer.  So even though the Midwest has had a pretty mild summer thus far don’t forget to water your landscape.

It’s not necessary to water lawns and plants every day. As a general rule, more plants are killed through over-watering than under-watering.

Established trees, shrubs, and perennials need approximately 1 inch of water each week. An easy way to determine if your landscape has been getting enough water is by investing in a rain gauge.  Mother Nature is the best provider of water to your lawn but she doesn’t always comply with our wishes.  When we are getting less than an inch of rain a week (or none in some cases) then it’s time to supplement additional moisture.

Water deeply and thoroughly, not daily. Frequent, shallow watering causes plants to produce shallow roots that cannot survive the heat and dry conditions of mid-summer months. Watering deeply and infrequently causes plant roots to grow deeply into the soil in search of the water, resulting in deeply rooted, more drought resistant plants.

The optimal time for watering is in the morning, this allows the turf grass to dry out before night time avoiding possible disease problems.  Also be aware of plants that are prone to fungal diseases, such as roses and lilacs and try to avoid overhead watering.

By taking the proper steps to maintaining your landscape you’ll be helping your plants to grow more vigorously, thereby creating a strong plant that will survive our Midwest winters!

pond

 

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It’s time for a haircut! Well for your plants at least.

Summer pruning and deadheading is a repetitive job but it is something we need to do to ensure that plants continue to flower all season long and will add healthy new growth next year. It allows the plant to slow its growth down by reducing the surface area of the leaves therefore slowing down the amount of food produced and sent to the roots. Pruning in summer is also a great time for corrective purpose.

Basic Pruning practices:

  1. Remove any dead or diseased wood. Although it is more difficult to see the outline of a tree in leaf, it should be easier once you have removed any unhealthy stems.
  2. Take out stems that are growing toward the center of the tree. Be wary of pruning large branches that will heal slowly.
  3. Remove any crossing branches to prevent them from rubbing against each other and causing wounds that may result in serious damage
  4. Prune out weak stems that did not produce flowers or that have few leaves, and rub out shoots forming on the lower trunk.
  5. Keep the tree in shape by reducing the length of wayward side stems and excessive new growth by cutting them back by about one-third.

Hedges grow rapidly in summer. The heavy shearing of hedges that exposes too much of the interior wood and the tender interior leaves, will cause scorching from the hot summer sun. Sunburn then kills the wood and leaves, resulting in a half-dead, scraggly hedge. It is best to shear hedges lightly and frequently in summer.

Perhaps the most labor-intensive plants to prune in the garden are the perennials. Perennials are not maintenance-free as most new gardeners might think. Most perennial plants, especially the flowering ones, not only need to be cut back entirely at some point before or after the growing season, they need regular pruning, shearing or deadheading.

Pruning generally creates a healthier, more robust and attractive plant.

winnetka-il-perennial-flower-bed-600x400

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It’s not always about the flowers.

I love flowers but in our gardens they are fleeting and demand more maintenance.  Perennials come in stages, flowering shrubs and trees flower for such a short time and annuals add a pop of color but need to be replaced every year.  But what we do see all year long is the foliage; this is where color and texture can really break up the monotony of green!

There are some great plants that are available purely for their foliage (the flowers are secondary).  The change of color, from either a nice deep burgundy or bright chartreuse, can easily break up the wall of green in most planting beds. Don’t forget about textures as well.  Leaves of all the same size and shape bleed together; but adding different shapes and sizes of leaves will break up the border.

There are a great number of plants that use their foliage as their selling point, from perennials to trees and shrubs.  Here are a just a few great additions to the garden.

 

weigela rubidor soft and hard textures heuchera palace purple
heliopsis loraine sunshine cornus kousa wolf eyes eupatorium chocolate
japanese maple heuchera caramel play with texture
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Happy 4th of July!

Have a safe and happy 4th!

fireworks

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Emerald Ash Borer

The devastation of the emerald ash borer is more apparent than ever. Do you have an ash tree in your landscape? Is it slowly declining? Then you more than likely have a tree that was affected by the borer. How can you tell?

• The adult beetle will create a “D” shaped hole in the bark of the tree. Once the larvae emerge you may also see increased woodpecker damage as they like to feed on the larvae.

• Dieback usually begins in the top one-third of the canopy and progresses down the tree until it is bare.

• You may also notice epicormis shoots, these are the sprouts (suckers) that grow from the roots and trunk of the tree. The leaves of these shoots are often larger than normal.

What now? Well once the tree has been affected by the beetle it’s pretty much too late. You will need to have the tree removed. This is best done by a professional as there are strict regulations on what to do with the tree.

When planning your landscape be sure to plant a variety of trees of different species. This allows for biodiversity and a number of habitats for wildlife. If we plant a monoculture of plants you will see what can happen when a disease or insect becomes a problem (such as dutch elm disease and now emerald ash borer).

emerald ash borer damage (1)

An entire street lined with Ash now destroyed by the borer.

emerald ash borer d hole

Typical borer “D” shaped holes.

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In Bloom…

Lupine (1)

gaillardia (2)

amsonia blue star (1)

achillea moonshine (10)

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Hear David Van Zelst speak…

when: June 14 at 12:30 and 1:30

where: 681 Lincoln Ave, Winnetka

David will be speaking on the use of social media/pinterest and it’s influence on the design process and about organic influenced gardening.  Copies of his book “Transformation: Ideas for the Midwestern Landscape” will be available for purchase, proceeds of sales will go to www.youevanston.org.

 

RSVP to Linda Martin
Call 847-275-7253 or Email [email protected]

 

Van Zelst, Inc.

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The birds and the bees and butterflies too!

nestCommuning with nature is a great way to spend the evening after a long day of hard work and relax. The best gardens are those that are wildlife friendly! Here are a few tips to make your landscape a more welcoming environment. Birds of all species need various nesting sites. It’s good to have a variety of trees, shrubs and evergreens. Even an old dead tree can fit into your landscape to invite woodpeckers and nuthatches to nest. Butterflies need nectar sources, host sources (for the caterpillars) and shelter. And all living beings need water, a great way to attract more wildlife is to include a water source.

Here’s small list of plants to entice the birds, bees and butterflies!

Trees and shrubs for birds:
Serviceberry (amelanchier)-the birds love to gobble up the berries in the spring!
Hawthorn (crataegus)-great protective tree for nesting and produces berries for a food source.
Colorado Spruce or Norway Spruce (picea)-A great protective nesting site for birds (as with most other evergreens).
Red/Black Chokeberry (aronia)-another great food source for birds.

Butterfly garden plants:
Yarrow (achillea)
Columbine (aquilegia)
False Indigo (baptisia)
Butterfly Bush (buddleia)
Caryopteris
Tickseed (coreopsis)
Delphinium
Coneflowers (echinacea)
Bee Balm (monarda)
Penstemon
Sedums
Goldenrod (solidago)

A small pond or fountain makes a great open water source.

 

 

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